Phil Hui Wins World Series of Poker $1500 Pot Limit Omaha Events for Third Career Bracelet

Dallas Council Wants To Shut Down Poker Tables 2 Years After Allowing Them

Phil Hui is the latest World Series of Poker winner and is now a three-time gold bracelet winner. Hui, who is based in Florida, secured his third gold bracelet after beating a field of 1,437 entries during the $1500 Pot Limit Omaha 8-Max event. This event had a buy-in of $1500 and would see Hui walk away with the top prize of $311,782.

As a result, Hui has now managed to earn more than $3.5 million in tournament earnings. Hui is also married to an equally respected poker player known as Loni Hui. His wife, Loni, currently has 2 bracelets, which he earned when she took part in the 2013 $1,500 no-limit hold ’em event and the 2015 WSOP National Championships.

Phil Hui’s previous victories, on the other hand, were acquired in 2014 during the $3,000 Omaha eight-or-better, as well as in 2019’s $50,000 Poker Players Championship. These 2 tournaments saw Hui earn his best career payout of almost $1.1 million. 

For his victory during the 2022 $1,500 pot-limit Omaha eight-max event, Hui was awarded card player points totaling 960. This stellar finish now marks Hui’s 5th table finish and his second title of 2022, with his 4 earlier scores stemming from various $400 buy-in events. Now that he has an accumulated point total of 1350 points, Hui now occupies the 11th spot in this year’s POY race standards according to the Global Poker statistics.

The $1,500 pot-limit Omaha eight-max event was one of the most well attended this year managing to generate a prize pool of an excess of $1.9 million. This $1.9 million was then distributed among the first 216 finishers. During this tournament, plenty of established names successfully made deep runs.

Some of the names that took part include Erick Lindgren who is a 2-time bracelet winner that finished in 86th place and $3,528. Other bracelet winners that took part in the tournament also include 2-time bracelet winners Erick Lindgren, Dash Dudley, Marco Johnson, Robert Cowen, Brandon Cantu, as well as one-time winner Randy Ohel were also in attendance.

World Series of Poker Main Event champion 

The 2022 WSOP kicked off on May 31st and concluded on the 19th July on the Las Vegas Strip. This year’s Main Event was one of the most highly anticipated reaching the money payout during the 40th day of WSOP.  

For the first time, the poker tournament was held at Bally’s Las Vegas instead of its traditional venue at the Rio All-Suite. Before the change, WSOP had been hosted in the same venue since 2005. This year’s version saw more than 8,663 participants signing up in the second largest poker tournament in history.

The participants were each guaranteed to walk away with at least $15,000 from a prize pool that surpassed $80 million. The players from the pool of 8,6663 entries battled it out in No Limit Texas Holdem until there were only 9 final players to face off in the WSOP World Championship Main Event.

This year’s event almost made the all-time record. The last time WSOP generated more than $80 million in a net prize pool was in 2006 when it successfully attracted 8,773 participants.  After it was all said and done, Espen Jorstad would win this year’s WSOP Main Event defeating the pool of 8,662 poker players that had signed up. 

Jorstad defeated Adrian Attenborough from Australia to take home the grand prize of $10 million. Micheal Duek also managed to make it to the Final Table whereby he managed to finish in third place and a $4 million cash price.

Based on WSOP’s reports, $10 million cash prize now means that he is the most successful Norwegian poker player of all time surpassing Felix Stephensen. Stephensen made history in Norway when he became the first poker player to win $5.1 million when he finished in second place during the WSOP in 2014.

Last year’s WSOP winner, on the other hand, was none other than German Poker player Koray Aldemir. Aldemir won the 2021 WSOP Main Event and in the process also secured an $8 million payday. Aldemir beat American poker player George Holmes at the No-Limit Texas Hold’em tournament.

In the end, George Holmes was awarded $4.3 million as the runner-up, his first tournament finish in his career. Before his second-place finish, Holmes had previously finished 213th in the 2019 WSOP where he walked away with $50,885. Before his win, Aldemir had earned more than $12 million in poker tournament winnings before being crowned king of the 2021 Main Event.

Final Table Play at WSOP Main EVENT Champion

The winners of the WSOP Main event then continued through the Final Table Olay to crown a new WSOP Main Event champion between July 15th and 16th. The winner of the championship, Benjamin Kaupp, secured the final bracelet after he took down the Tournament of Championship to walk home with $250,000.

This was Kaupp’s first bracelet. This tournament of champions was exclusively available to the winners of the bracelet and circuit rings, who combined were 470 in total. The 470 participants all took part in the freeroll for an opportunity to take a piece of the $1,000,000 prize pool home.  Kaupp qualified for the tournament after he won the $215 WSOP Circuit event in Pennsylvania. This event saw him walk away with $14,954. This is the greatest win of Kaupp’s career.

Final Thoughts

To date, the World Series of Poker stands as the biggest and most prestigious poker competition in the world. So far, the WSOP has managed to award professional poker players with more than $3.5 billion in prize money and numerous gold bracelets. Consisting of a comprehensive slate of tournaments in almost every poker format there is, WSOP dates back to 1970 and is to date the longest-running tournament in history.

Based on the positive reception that this year’s tournament has received from poker players and supporters, the 2022 inaugural competition on the Strip has been nothing short of phenomenal. Next year, when the event returns to the Horseshoe Las Vegas, it is expected to generate a lot more interest than ever before.

Author: Erika Woods